McKinsey / LeanIn Study: Women in the Workplace 2017

Women remain underrepresented at every level in corporate America, despite earning more college degrees than men for thirty years and counting. There is a pressing need to do more, and most organizations realize this: company commitment to gender diversity is at an all-time high for the third year in a row.

Despite this commitment, progress continues to be too slow—and may even be stalling. One of the most powerful reasons for this is a simple one: we have blind spots when it comes to diversity, and we can’t solve problems that we don’t see or understand clearly. In fact, a majority of men and 1 in 3 women think that if women make up 10% of executive roles at a company, the organization is on the right path.

Microsoft CEO says tech’s progress on gender equality is ‘not sufficient’

“We always had equal pay for equal work, but it’s more about equal opportunity for equal work,” Mr. Nadella said at a TimesTalks event hosted by The New York Times. “In tech, we do have a significant distance to cover… My job is about creating a system that allows women to participate, to feel free to ask for a raise, to expect to be recognized for their progress — I had not internalized how the system was not working.”

Men Join Corporate Boards With Less Experience Than Women

More than three out of four new male company directors are rookies, appointed without any prior corporate board experience, according to a new study of the world’s biggest publicly traded companies.

Breaking the Gender Barrier in Engineering

How Dartmouth became one of the first national research universities to a graduate a majority-female class of engineers. Hint: “we didn’t get here with a well-worn roadmap. What we sought to create was a better engineering experience for all students, and along the way found that these strategies helped engage all aspiring engineers, bringing more women into our program.”

On Women’s Equality Day, More Companies Promise Change

100% Talent signatory Deloitte is among the dozens of businesses that have signed on to the White House Equal Pay Pledge. Companies that sign on acknowledge the critical role that businesses must play in reducing the national gender pay gap.

 

Coding students tell Congresswoman there’s no simple solution to tech’s diversity problem

U.S. Congresswoman Suzan DelBene — who’s worked at Microsoft, drugstore.com, and Nimble Technology— visited Seattle’s Ada Developers Academy to discuss this persistent issue. Many of Ada’s women agree: there is no single program that can fix tech’s diversity problems. Ada students listed a multitude of things that have kept them from entering the work force: a lack of role models, the discomfort of being the only woman in a room, or simply being told women aren’t suited to tech work.

How to separate skilled candidates from skilled interviewees

One of the most important is “Can you do the job?” Simple, right? Not always. At the executive level, the ability to do a job is not just about technical skills, but also about leadership and interpersonal skills. Technical skills help candidates climb the corporate ladder, but the ability to manage up, down, and sideways becomes more important at the executive level.

Seattle Gender Equity for Startups & Small Businesses Workshops Begin Sept 12

An introductory workshop series for startups and small businesses ready to invest in creating a more inclusive and equitable workspace.

Maria Renz keynotes Amazon’s first Women’s Entrepreneur Conference

A year ago, Maria Renz she became the first woman named technical advisor to CEO Jeff Bezos (a coveted rung on Amazon’s leadership ladder). Today, she delivered the keynote address at Amazon’s first-ever Women’s Entrepreneur Conference. “You learn the most when you’re both comfortable and challenged,” she said.

How This Woman Is Fighting for Gender Equality in Tech

Dr. Telle Whitney, President and CEO of the Anita Borg Institute, describes the challenges and opportunities for increasing women in tech, from pipelines to org culture.