100% Talent Wage Gap Summit

Wage Gap Summit combined 2019_compressed

100% Talent presents the second Wage Gap Summit event, addressing the gender wage gap and gender equity in the workplace.

Keynote speaker: Jonathan Sposato, Co-founder of GeekWire, PicMonkey and WeCount.org and author of “Better Together: 8 Ways Working with Women Leads to Extraordinary Products and Profits”. In 2015, Sposato was the first male investor who vowed to only fund startups with at least one female co-founder. Following Sposato’s presentation, Deena Pierott, with Black Women in STEM 2.0, iUrban Teen and City of Seattle interviewed Sposato live onstage.

Additional topics through panels, conversation and Q&A:

Tools and Metrics to Measure and Understand Gender Gap Data in Your Organization
Speakers include: Katie Bardaro, PayScale; Zev Eigen, Syndio

Caretaker Penalty?: How Breaks in Employment Adversely Affect Women and Sustain the Gender Wage Gap
Panelists include: Maria Colacurcio, Syndio; Nancy McSharry Jensen, The Swing Shift; Ambika Singh, Armoire; Trisha Tyler, Mercer
Moderator: Kela Hall, K.D. Hall Foundation

The Future of Work: Increasing Equity and Inclusion in the Workplace
Speakers include: a representative from Mercer; Gretchen Peri, Slalom; Diane Thurston, Point B
Moderator: Lauren Sato, The Riveter

Introducers and Facilitators:
Lucy Helm, Starbucks; Alix Hughes, Amazon; Molly Moon Neitzel, Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream; Christina Weber, T-Mobile; Karen Wilkins-Mickey, Alaska Airlines

Tips for Employers in States with Pending Paid Leave Laws

Washington’s new paid family leave program is incrementally going into effect since the law passed in July 2017. 100% Talent signatory Panorama has you covered with it’s Tips for Employers in States with Pending Paid Leave Laws, a roundup of best practices and resources to provide useful guidance to adhere with state and local paid leave laws.

New Answers To The Gender Bias Challenge In The Workplace

When we think about gender equality, we probably first think about workplace issues and equal pay. We think about statistics like “7.2% of women are pilots” or “only 24% of women in public accounting are partners or firm owners.”

That’s important, but this writer examines other facts about gender bias in science and how it can bring us new answers to build a better, more inclusive work environment in business.

Co-working space for women The Riveter is launching in Seattle to build community and challenge ‘bro-working’

Two Seattle’s women and their vision to launch The Riveter, co-working space where women don’t feel excluded from the business world because of their gender.

A Survey of Seattle Start-Ups: Insights on Org Culture & Diversity

This fall, a team including Martha Burwell, an independent consultant, Ruchika Tulshyan, and Artemis Connection, a consultancy focused on aligning strategy and team, were pondering the Seattle tech industry along with our oft-criticized tendency to not talk about issues like race and diversity. To understand what these facts meant for our startups culture, we surveyed more than 315+ employees at start-ups (defined as companies with fewer than 250 employees) in the Seattle area about their experience.

Gender equality a marathon, not a sprint says Deloitte CEO

100% Talent Signatory Deloitte is working to advance pay equity and gender equality. “At Deloitte, we view diversity and inclusion as central to our firm’s culture and our ability to tackle our clients’ most complex business problems.”

ReBoot career accelerator launches in Seattle to help women return to work

One of the greatest barriers to workforce gender equity is that far more women than men take time off to care for children and elderly relatives, and then struggle to pick up where they left off.  To address these challenges, ReBoot, a Silicon Valley training program that helps women re-enter the workforce, is launching in Seattle this month.

A Conservative Push for Paid Family Leave

Conservative think tank American Action Forum surprised many with its issuance of a policy proposal for paid family leave. The plan offers up to 12 weeks of paid leave to the working poor and is modeled on the already successful earned income tax credit.