California has a new law: No more all-male boards

Companies headquarted in California can no longer have all-male boards. That’s according to a new law, enacted Sunday, which requires publicly traded firms in the state to place at least one woman on their board of directors by the end of 2019 — or face a penalty.

Women in the Workplace 2017

More companies are committing to gender equality. But progress will remain slow unless we confront blind spots on diversity—particularly regarding women of color, and employee perceptions of the status quo.

Gender equality: Why Procter and Gamble is on a mission to raise women up

See how P&G is integrating more women into management and director roles, ensuring flexible work opportunities, and leveraging accelerator programs to retain and promote women and key points in their careers.

Understanding “Equal Pay” and How to Achieve It

Three common ways the pay gap is measured, what leading companies are doing about it, and the best strategies to consider today.

A Study Used Sensors to Show That Men and Women Are Treated Differently at Work

See the results of sensor data in the workplace, what it means for women advancing in the workplace, and ideas on what companies can do to improve female representation in leadership.

How Companies Can Guard Against Fatigue About Gender Equality

Show you are serious about basics like mentoring and work-life flexibility, and energy and enthusiasm will follow, writes McKinsey’s Dominic Barton.

McKinsey / LeanIn Study: Women in the Workplace 2017

Women remain underrepresented at every level in corporate America, despite earning more college degrees than men for thirty years and counting. There is a pressing need to do more, and most organizations realize this: company commitment to gender diversity is at an all-time high for the third year in a row.

Despite this commitment, progress continues to be too slow—and may even be stalling. One of the most powerful reasons for this is a simple one: we have blind spots when it comes to diversity, and we can’t solve problems that we don’t see or understand clearly. In fact, a majority of men and 1 in 3 women think that if women make up 10% of executive roles at a company, the organization is on the right path.

Microsoft CEO says tech’s progress on gender equality is ‘not sufficient’

“We always had equal pay for equal work, but it’s more about equal opportunity for equal work,” Mr. Nadella said at a TimesTalks event hosted by The New York Times. “In tech, we do have a significant distance to cover… My job is about creating a system that allows women to participate, to feel free to ask for a raise, to expect to be recognized for their progress — I had not internalized how the system was not working.”

These Major Advertisers Are Joining Forces Against Sexist Ads Once And For All

Sexism is increasingly less and less marketable. Some of the world’s largest companies and advertising agencies, led by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) have launched a new initiative to banish gender stereotypes from advertising. A partnership between U.N. Women and several major global companies — including 100% Talent signatory Microsoft, Unilever, Johnson & Johnson, Procter & Gamble, Mattel, Facebook, Google and others — the Unstereotype Alliance aims to spread “realistic, non-biased portrayals of women and men” in their ads.

Women financial advisers at Wells Fargo 27% more likely to lose their job: study

Female financial advisers get punished more severely than men, especially at Wells Fargo. That’s according to a new working paper that finds female employees who engage in misconduct at Wells Fargo Advisors are 27% more likely than their male counterparts to have lost their jobs.