100% Talent Wage Gap Summit

Wage Gap Summit combined 2019_compressed

100% Talent presents the second Wage Gap Summit event, addressing the gender wage gap and gender equity in the workplace.

Keynote speaker: Jonathan Sposato, Co-founder of GeekWire, PicMonkey and WeCount.org and author of “Better Together: 8 Ways Working with Women Leads to Extraordinary Products and Profits”. In 2015, Sposato was the first male investor who vowed to only fund startups with at least one female co-founder. Following Sposato’s presentation, Deena Pierott, with Black Women in STEM 2.0, iUrban Teen and City of Seattle interviewed Sposato live onstage.

Additional topics through panels, conversation and Q&A:

Tools and Metrics to Measure and Understand Gender Gap Data in Your Organization
Speakers include: Katie Bardaro, PayScale; Zev Eigen, Syndio

Caretaker Penalty?: How Breaks in Employment Adversely Affect Women and Sustain the Gender Wage Gap
Panelists include: Maria Colacurcio, Syndio; Nancy McSharry Jensen, The Swing Shift; Ambika Singh, Armoire; Trisha Tyler, Mercer
Moderator: Kela Hall, K.D. Hall Foundation

The Future of Work: Increasing Equity and Inclusion in the Workplace
Speakers include: a representative from Mercer; Gretchen Peri, Slalom; Diane Thurston, Point B
Moderator: Lauren Sato, The Riveter

Introducers and Facilitators:
Lucy Helm, Starbucks; Alix Hughes, Amazon; Molly Moon Neitzel, Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream; Christina Weber, T-Mobile; Karen Wilkins-Mickey, Alaska Airlines

Understanding “Equal Pay” and How to Achieve It

Three common ways the pay gap is measured, what leading companies are doing about it, and the best strategies to consider today.

How Companies Can Guard Against Fatigue About Gender Equality

Show you are serious about basics like mentoring and work-life flexibility, and energy and enthusiasm will follow, writes McKinsey’s Dominic Barton.

McKinsey / LeanIn Study: Women in the Workplace 2017

Women remain underrepresented at every level in corporate America, despite earning more college degrees than men for thirty years and counting. There is a pressing need to do more, and most organizations realize this: company commitment to gender diversity is at an all-time high for the third year in a row.

Despite this commitment, progress continues to be too slow—and may even be stalling. One of the most powerful reasons for this is a simple one: we have blind spots when it comes to diversity, and we can’t solve problems that we don’t see or understand clearly. In fact, a majority of men and 1 in 3 women think that if women make up 10% of executive roles at a company, the organization is on the right path.