100% Talent Signatory Mercer Achieves EDGE Certification for Gender Equity in the Workplace

Congratulations to Mercer on this international recognition for their efforts to achieve workplace gender equity, promote women, and reduce the gender pay gap.

Check out some of Mercer’s groundbreaking research on advancing women in the workplace through their When Women Thrive initiative.

Tips for Employers in States with Pending Paid Leave Laws

Washington’s new paid family leave program is incrementally going into effect since the law passed in July 2017. 100% Talent signatory Panorama has you covered with it’s Tips for Employers in States with Pending Paid Leave Laws, a roundup of best practices and resources to provide useful guidance to adhere with state and local paid leave laws.

Why Iceland’s New Pay Equity Law Will Only Go So Far in Closing the Gender Pay Gap

Iceland is trying a new approach for government certification that companies pay men and women the same for equal work. But there is doubt as to how much of a silver bullet this will be in closing the pay gap.

Gender equality: Why Procter and Gamble is on a mission to raise women up

See how P&G is integrating more women into management and director roles, ensuring flexible work opportunities, and leveraging accelerator programs to retain and promote women and key points in their careers.

Understanding “Equal Pay” and How to Achieve It

Three common ways the pay gap is measured, what leading companies are doing about it, and the best strategies to consider today.

A Study Used Sensors to Show That Men and Women Are Treated Differently at Work

See the results of sensor data in the workplace, what it means for women advancing in the workplace, and ideas on what companies can do to improve female representation in leadership.

How Companies Can Guard Against Fatigue About Gender Equality

Show you are serious about basics like mentoring and work-life flexibility, and energy and enthusiasm will follow, writes McKinsey’s Dominic Barton.

McKinsey / LeanIn Study: Women in the Workplace 2017

Women remain underrepresented at every level in corporate America, despite earning more college degrees than men for thirty years and counting. There is a pressing need to do more, and most organizations realize this: company commitment to gender diversity is at an all-time high for the third year in a row.

Despite this commitment, progress continues to be too slow—and may even be stalling. One of the most powerful reasons for this is a simple one: we have blind spots when it comes to diversity, and we can’t solve problems that we don’t see or understand clearly. In fact, a majority of men and 1 in 3 women think that if women make up 10% of executive roles at a company, the organization is on the right path.

Microsoft CEO says tech’s progress on gender equality is ‘not sufficient’

“We always had equal pay for equal work, but it’s more about equal opportunity for equal work,” Mr. Nadella said at a TimesTalks event hosted by The New York Times. “In tech, we do have a significant distance to cover… My job is about creating a system that allows women to participate, to feel free to ask for a raise, to expect to be recognized for their progress — I had not internalized how the system was not working.”

Why are companies’ gender equality efforts failing?

A new McKinsey report found that of 69 companies employing more than than half a million people, very few had targets, milestones or programs aimed at helping women reach leadership positions. While more than half of companies considered gender diversity a top 10 strategic priority, just 14 percent had clearly articulated a business case for change.